Blog posts by research

Written by Jane Sooby on Monday, October 20, 2014 on funding, research

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) recently awarded the Organic Farming Research Foundation (OFRF) a grant to evaluate federal organic research programs.    USDA awarded the grant through the Organic Research and Extension Initiative (OREI) and the Organic Transitions program. This year, USDA awarded $23 million in grants under these programs to improve the competitiveness of organic crop and livestock producers.    OFRF will use the OREI grant to conduct topical and regional evaluations of OREI-funded programs. The project will assess to what degree each project involved organic...
Written by Jon Knapp on Monday, August 11, 2014 on marketing, research

The Organic Trade Association (OTA) is currently in the process of evaluating the Organic Check-off program, which would fund research and aid in promotion of organic agriculture. Other “check-off programs” include the “Got Milk?” campaign and The Wool Trust, which provides grant opportunities to assist the expansion of wool development in the United States. These existing programs are wonderful agricultural opportunities, but they don’t necessarily fulfill the needs of organic farmers and producers. A Consumer Reports survey highlighted that shoppers now credit “natural” with attributes that...
Written by Jon Knapp on Monday, July 14, 2014 on grower, research, seeds


The Organic Farming Research Foundation (OFRF) is currently working on a project that could assist organic farmers in seed treatment. Conventional farming practices that focus on chemical treatment and fumigation can be harmful to both the environment and humans alike, and many of these methods are prohibited in organic production. OFRF is expanding on the work of prior studies that found suppression of soil-borne plant pathogens from microbes present in solid and liquid organic soil amendments. OFRF seeks to identify which specific subset of microbes is responsible for this pathogen...
Written by Guest Blogger on Monday, July 14, 2014 on grower, pests and pesticides, research


Citrus greening disease, also known by its Chinese name Huanglongbing, threatens the citrus industry on a massive scale. It has devastated millions of acres of citrus crops throughout the United States and abroad, ravaging citrus in countries in Asia, Africa, and South America. The highly destructive disease can spread quickly, and once a tree is infected it cannot be cured. Citrus greening is spread by the Asian citrus psyllid, a small insect that transmits the disease as it feeds on the leaves and stems of citrus trees. These psyllids are prolific breeders, with each female laying up to 800...