materials and inputs

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Improving Materials Tracking and MyCCOF

Over the last year, CCOF has created computerized records for all inputs used by our clients. These records allow us to improve organization and streamline material reviews. During this process, CCOF developed an internal materials list that combines all internal CCOF material reviews as well as both the OMRI and WSDA lists. As files have been reviewed during this time, CCOF added each client's inputs to their operation's database record. In the coming months, CCOF will provide access to the "inputs tab" in each client's MyCCOF portal.

Long Live the Materials Evolution

Improvements for Materials Tracking and Approvals Continue: We have heard loud and clear that one of our clients’ biggest frustrations with the certification process is the paperwork surrounding input materials approval. In response, CCOF has been undergoing a materials evolution focused on making the process more efficient and less burdensome. We hope that you will find these changes to be positive, and welcome your feedback at any time!

Materials List Improvement

Your Materials List is now grouped by type of material, instead of only being grouped by scope. For example, all fertilizers will be in one section, and all pest control materials another. This change should help you identify the materials that are approved for use more quickly and easily! Look for the change when you receive your next updated materials list from CCOF. Remember that you can also view, manage, and print your own list in MyCCOF

Materials List Improvements

To save you time and money, your Materials List in MyCCOF is now grouped by type of material, instead of only being grouped by scope. This means that all fertilizers or additives are grouped together instead merely listed alphabetically.

New this year, you can also use MyCCOF to export an Excel compatible list for your own use. Simply visit your Materials List in MyCCOF and click the Excel icon.

MyCCOF: Materials Search – Viva La Revolution!

The CCOF materials revolution continued in January 2014 with a bold new offering free for all CCOF-certified members.

Postharvest Handling Draft Guidance is Open for Comment

On April 25, 2014 the National Organic Program released a proposed guidance document regarding Substances Used in Postharvest Handling of Organic Products. This guidance addresses the materials that may be used in on-farm or other immediate postharvest situations. This guidance clarifies some confusion between what materials, such as diatomaceous earth or carbon dioxide, could be used in what contexts in a postharvest setting. Comments are due by June 24.

The Future of Chlorine

The National Organic Program (NOP) recently announced an important clarification to the use of chlorine in organic production systems. This may require operational changes for some CCOF clients who use chlorine for postharvest washing of crops. The NOP now requires that a potable water rinse follows chlorine used in postharvest water at more than 4 parts per million (ppm). CCOF was previously able to approve the use of chlorine at levels above 4 ppm in postharvest usage because of industry confusion over the meaning of the word "residual" in the regulations.

CCOF Introduces First-of-its-Kind Online Materials Search

Industry-leading innovation makes certification easier and faster.

(January 22, 2014) Santa Cruz, CA – CCOF continues to streamline organic certification through its materials revolution and will demo a new Materials Search service January 22-25 in Pacific Grove, California, at the CCOF exhibitor booth at EcoFarm.

Asian Citrus Psyllid Concerns

Understandably, organic growers are concerned about the Asian Citrus Psyllid (ACP), a pest that is a carrier of a devastating disease of citrus trees, huanglongbing (HLB). ACP findings are particularly concerning for organic producers because of how few choices there are for organic control methods. In cases of CDFA eradication efforts, there are no currently accepted organic treatments, but organic producers do have tools for management and prevention. 

Balancing the Soil Fertility Equation: Five Ways to Reduce Nitrogen Leaching

Widespread leakage of nitrogen from agricultural production has become a huge problem worldwide. Recent news articles have reported that numerous small towns in California’s central valley, the country’s most productive agricultural region, must use bottled water because their municipal water supplies are contaminated with dangerous levels of nitrates.

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