DARK Act Dead—For Now

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Los tiempos de respuesta serán lentos debido a los incendios forestales afectando al condado de Santa Cruz y COVID-19. Los plazos de cumplimiento orgánico y las inspecciones se retrasarán para los negocios afectados por estas crisis.  Lea las últimas actualizaciones sobre los incendios forestales del norte de California y visite nuestra página web de Covid-19 para encontrar información específica a la pandemia »

After pulling some political shenanigans in the U.S. Senate Agriculture Committee, committee chair Pat Roberts failed to gain the votes needed to move the anti-GMO labeling bill forward.

The bill popularly known as the DARK Act—an acronym for Deny Americans the Right to Know—was approved by the U.S. House of Representatives last year and forwarded to the Senate. The bill preempts states’ ability to require GMO labeling of food products and creates a voluntary labeling system.

Political observers note that politicians are feeling pressure to pass legislation to head off implementation of Vermont’s GMO labeling law, which goes into effect July 1, 2016.

The saga may not be over: Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell voted “yes” on the motion to not forward the bill in a procedural move that will allow him to reintroduce the bill later.

For a detailed account of the Senate action, refer to NSAC’s blog.

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