Blog posts by Guest Blogger

Written by Guest Blogger on Monday, August 31, 2015 on financial assistance, policy

CCOF encourages growers who implement conservation practices to contact their local U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS). The NRCS is undertaking a major “reboot” of the Conservation Stewardship Program (CSP) which will be implemented at the beginning of 2016. This “reboot” is an important opportunity for farmers to provide feedback to the NRCS. Specifically, CCOF is encouraging the NRCS to make the following improvements to CSP:NRCS should rank existing conservation practices the same as additional conservation practices. NRCS has consistently...
Written by Guest Blogger on Monday, August 10, 2015 on financial assistance, policy

CCOF is continuing to search for feedback from farmers who have experience with the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Conservation Stewardship Program (CSP).If you have experience with CSP or are interested in the program, please take a few minutes to complete the following survey: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/CSP_Survey_Feedback.This is a busy time of year, and we greatly appreciate any feedback. The results of this survey will help make CSP more accessible to farmers.What is the Conservation Stewardship Program? CSP is a national conservation program administered by the USDA’s...
Written by Guest Blogger on Friday, July 17, 2015 on financial assistance, policy

CCOF is seeking the feedback of farmers who have experience with the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Conservation Stewardship Program (CSP). Whether you are currently enrolled in CSP, have enrolled in the past, attempted to apply, or are just thinking about signing up, we want your input! We are looking for information such as personal experience with the program, barriers you have encountered, criticisms or praises, and any other relevant information. Contact Eric Cissna at ecissna@ccof.org to share your experiences.What is the Conservation Stewardship Program? CSP is a national...
Written by Guest Blogger on Tuesday, July 14, 2015 on rating system

Today CCOF and Whole Foods Market (WFM) jointly announced new changes to WFM’s Responsibly Grown rating program and its enrollment process for certified organic flower and produce farmers. These changes include allowing current organic vendors to suspend enrollment efforts until the end of this year, immediately relieving pressure for many small and medium sized producers. WFM also announced its intention to positively alter both the scoring and presentation of certified organic products, while committing to expanded dialogue about the program with vendors and other stakeholders. CCOF’s...
Written by Guest Blogger on Tuesday, July 14, 2015 on rating system

In May of this year, a group of five certified organic fruit and vegetable farmers, whose combined careers represent 147 years’ experience in biological agriculture, approached the nation’s largest USDA National Organic Program (NOP) certifier, CCOF (California Certified Organic Farmers), for help in defending our certified organic label’s value in a volatile marketplace.  This appeal was prompted by a recent rollout in 400 Whole Foods Market (WFM) stores. The nation’s iconic retailer of certified organic produce developed a proprietary fruit, vegetable, and flower rating system, known as...
Written by Guest Blogger on Monday, April 20, 2015 on CalCAN, policy

CalCAN is excited to announce our leadership in a newly introduced state bill called the Agriculture Climate Benefits Act, or Senate Bill 367. The bill was introduced by Senator Lois Wolk (D-Yolo County), and is co-sponsored by CalCAN and our coalition partner, the Community Alliance with Family Farmers (CAFF). SB 367 promotes ‘climate-friendly’ agricultural practices that reduce greenhouse gas emissions and/or store carbon. It creates a new statewide competitive grant program, to be administered by the California Department of Food and Agriculture, that would receive $50 million in cap-and-...
Written by Guest Blogger on Monday, April 13, 2015 on CalCAN, events, policy

The 4th Climate & Agriculture Summit at UC Davis was, by all accounts, CalCAN’s most successful Summit yet. The daylong gathering on March 25 brought together 320 participants, including 65 farmers and ranchers from across California. Our 60+ speakers, panelists, moderators and poster presenters were uniformly excellent, demonstrating the amazing diversity and expertise of CalCAN’s partners and friends. Overall, the 4th CalCAN Summit was a testament to how far we have collectively come in our work to unleash agricultural solutions to climate change—and an important reminder of the...
Written by Guest Blogger on Monday, October 27, 2014 on farmers markets

California is the heart of our nation’s food and agricultural innovations, from popularizing farmers’ markets and organic agriculture in the 1970s and 1980s, to a renewed focus in recent years on fresh produce and local foods. As California goes, so goes the nation, right? With more than 800 farmers’ markets now operating in the Golden State, it is fair to say that California represents “ground zero” in the ever-evolving policy and operations issues that farmers’ markets face in the United States. Given this, the significance of Governor Jerry Brown signing Assembly Bill (AB) 1871 into law...
Written by Guest Blogger on Tuesday, September 2, 2014 on CCOF, policy

IntroductionKelly Damewood, CCOF Policy Director David Lester, student at Cal Poly San Luis Obispo, recently completed a summer internship with CCOF. Over the course of two months, he completed an in-depth review of county regulations that may support or encourage certified organic agriculture. Read on for an interesting and worthwhile summary of his findings. For over thirty years, CCOF – one of the first organic certification agencies in the United States – has worked on landmark law and policy such as the California Organic Food Act of 1979 and the National Organic Program (NOP). CCOF...
Written by Guest Blogger on Monday, July 14, 2014 on grower, pests and pesticides, research


Citrus greening disease, also known by its Chinese name Huanglongbing, threatens the citrus industry on a massive scale. It has devastated millions of acres of citrus crops throughout the United States and abroad, ravaging citrus in countries in Asia, Africa, and South America. The highly destructive disease can spread quickly, and once a tree is infected it cannot be cured. Citrus greening is spread by the Asian citrus psyllid, a small insect that transmits the disease as it feeds on the leaves and stems of citrus trees. These psyllids are prolific breeders, with each female laying up to 800...
Written by Guest Blogger on Monday, June 9, 2014 on help and tips

With the increasing cost of organic nitrogen inputs and regulatory restrictions on nitrogen applications in agriculture, it is important to maximize all sources of nitrogen to minimize cost, environmental impact and regulatory headaches. Here is a summary of important strategies to increase nitrogen efficiency: • Test soil, crop, and water to determine nitrogen status before adding nitrogen, of any source. • Use legume cover crops: Inoculate legume seeds at planting with fresh, living Rhizobium of the correct species. Plant immediately. Irrigate as needed to aid establishment and inoculation...
Written by Guest Blogger on Monday, April 21, 2014 on grower, help and tips, seeds


In the past, it was a challenge for many organic farmers to source organic seed. Fortunately, there are now a number of resources available to make it easier for farmers to find organic seed or to produce it themselves. These resources include the new Organic Seed Finder website, Organic Seed Alliance’s seed production publications, and the eOrganic Seed Resource Guide. Organic Seed Finder, hosted and managed by the Association of Official Seed Certifying Agencies (AOSCA), was launched in October 2012 and serves as a free resource for farmers, certifiers, and other stakeholders looking to...
Written by Guest Blogger on Monday, November 11, 2013 on help and tips

This post was written by Ann Baier, Organic/Sustainable Agriculture Specialist, NCAT. We are here, we are here! Remember that line in Dr. Seuss’ book, Horton Hears a Who? Well, the ATTRA Project of NCAT is here! Long-time allies with CCOF in our mission to foster organic, ecological, sustainable, and successful farmers, a link to ATTRA’s “Ask an Expert” program has been added to the “revolving carousel” of CCOF's homepage. Some of you might say, “We love ATTRA! Our farming business is alive and well because of the information we got from ATTRA.” Others may ask, “What is ATTRA?” ATTRA is the...
Written by Guest Blogger on Tuesday, November 5, 2013 on financial assistance, grower

This blog post was written by Sarah Tait of Kiva Zip and Alan Haight of Riverhill Farm. Kiva Zip is a nonprofit located in San Francisco, California, that offers 0% interest loans up to $5,000 to financially excluded entrepreneurs who lack access to traditional sources of capital. Kiva Zip is actively looking for small farms and food producers that could benefit from their program. Alan and his wife Jo, owners of Riverhill Farm in Nevada City, California, are one such example of a small farm benefitting from a Kiva Zip loan. They used their Kiva Zip loan to purchase equipment for their farm,...
Written by Guest Blogger on Thursday, October 24, 2013 on advocacy, seeds, standards

This post was written by Kristina Hubbard, director of advocacy and communications for Organic Seed Alliance. She recently published an article in Agriculture and Human Values entitled, "Confronting coexistence in the United States: organic agriculture, genetic engineering, and the case of Roundup Read alfalfa." For another opinion on organic seed issues, visit UNFI VP of Policy and Industry Relations Melody Meyer's blog, Organic Matters. Seed has been in the national headlines a lot these days. We’ve read about chefs teaming up with plant breeders to explore seed as a new frontier, and been...

Pages