From Field to Forum

Written by Guest Blogger on Tuesday, February 21, 2017 on advocacy, cost share, financial assistance, policy, State Organic Program


The California Department of Food and Agriculture’s (CDFA) State Organic Program (SOP) is pleased to announce a federal funding opportunity of $12.5 million for eligible applicants under the Organic Certification Cost Share Program (OCCSP). The SOP has applied to the Farm Service Agency (FSA) under the United States Department of Agriculture to assist in distribution of these funds. This money assists organic producers and handlers by offsetting costs related to SOP registration, certification, and transitional fees paid to certifiers as producers transition to organic. The cost share...
Written by Peter Nell on Tuesday, February 21, 2017 on advocacy, policy, regulatory

The California Department of Consumer Affairs’ Bureau of Medical Cannabis Regulation (BMCR) is now accepting applications for the Cannabis Advisory Committee. Applications are available online. The committee will advise the BMCR, California Department of Food and Agriculture’s CalCannabis Cultivation Licensing, and California Department of Public Heath’s Office of Manufactured Cannabis Safety on both the medical and adult recreational use of cannabis. Representatives from the cannabis industry, labor, state, and local agencies, public health experts, experienced individuals representing other...
Written by Guest Blogger on Tuesday, February 21, 2017 on advocacy, financial assistance, policy, water

Grant applications for the State Water Efficiency and Enhancement Program (SWEEP) are now being accepted through March 14, 2017. SWEEP provides financial assistance for farmers and ranchers to implement irrigation systems that save water and energy while reducing greenhouse gases on California agricultural operations. This week, the California Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA) announced an additional 22 grant application assistance workshops for farmers interested in applying to the program. The workshops are being hosted mostly by local Resource Conservation Districts and Extension...
Written by Jane Sooby on Tuesday, February 21, 2017 on advocacy, materials and inputs, NOSB, policy

The National Organic Program announced that two comment periods have been extended. Comments on the draft guidance on Calculating the Percentage of Organic Ingredients in Multi-Ingredient Products are now due April 7, 2017. CCOF urges all processor/handler members to review this draft guidance as it could impact product labels depending on how the calculations are made. CCOF will submit a comment on the draft guidance. Additionally, the comment period on changes to the National List for the 2017 Sunset period was also extended to April 19, 2017. Contact CCOF’s Policy Team for additional...
Written by Josaphine Stevenson on Monday, February 20, 2017 on CCOF Foundation, FOFGF Vocational & Higher Ed, Future Organic Farmer Grant Fund, future organic farmers


Akello Karamoko has always had a green thumb. He planted his first apple tree when he was 11 years old and sold peppermint and sage at his church at the age of 13. Farming as a career path was not on the minds of many of the children Karamoko grew up with in Detroit, Michigan, but he sought out programs to learn how to grow, plant, harvest, and sell his own organic crops. He participated in agricultural programs, including 4-H Gardens with Dr. Wesley Godfrey, Keep Growing Detroit's Urban Agriculture Youth Apprenticeship, the Food Warrior Program with Detroit Black Community Food Security...
Written by Jacob Guth on Monday, February 13, 2017 on CCOF


CCOF inspects and audits farms and packing-houses to the GFSI-benchmarked GLOBALG.A.P. food safety standards. GLOBALG.A.P. is the world’s leading standards organization for Good Agricultural Practices (GAPs) and has over 140,000 operations certified worldwide to their various standards. With the rolling out of the federal Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA), more and more certified organic farmers are being required to implement GAPs on their farms and in their packing-houses. Consequently, CCOF’s food safety program is growing and we are looking for individuals to hire as food safety...
Written by Jane Sooby on Monday, February 6, 2017 on advocacy, policy, research

Contribute to the pool of organic knowledge by responding to the 2016 Certified Organic Survey. Farmers and ranchers will reap benefits from an accurate statistical portrait of the organic sector. Agricultural statistics are frequently used by business and policy decision-makers, and your participation provides solid data to shape organic policy. The United States Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) is conducting the 2016 Certified Organic Survey to gather new data on certified organic crops and livestock commodities in the United States. This...
Written by Jane Sooby on Monday, February 6, 2017 on advocacy, policy

The California Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA) is developing a Healthy Soils Program that has two objectives: to build soil carbon and reduce agricultural greenhouse gas emissions through incentives and demonstrations to farmers. CDFA now invites comment on the proposed framework for this program through March 1, 2017. Submit comments to cdfa.oefi@cdfa.ca.gov. CDFA’s Office of Environmental Farming and Innovation unveiled proposed details of the Healthy Soils Program framework at the Environmental Farming Act Science Advisory Panel’s meeting on January 19, 2017. Elements of the...
Written by Jane Sooby on Monday, February 6, 2017 on advocacy, policy, State Organic Program

On January 26, the California Organic Products Advisory Committee (COPAC) held its first meeting of the year where it welcomed six new committee members and elected Mindee Jeffery of Good Earth Natural Food as committee chair. COPAC advises the Secretary of the California Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA) on organic issues. Current Secretary Karen Ross recently appointed six new members to the committee, including three producer seats, two alternate producer seats, and an environmental seat. Several seats remain open for appointment, including a processor seat, a newly created...
Written by Peter Nell on Monday, January 30, 2017 on advocacy, farm bill, policy

Secretary of the California Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA) Karen Ross will host five listening sessions on the forthcoming 2018 Farm Bill. The listening sessions are an opportunity to provide input and recommendations on California’s federal policy and program priorities. “The farm bill is as important to San Francisco and Los Angeles as it is to the Central Valley,” said Secretary Ross. “This legislation ensures a robust farm safety net, promotes farming and ranching practices that are environmentally sound, and provides important nutritional funding for our citizens. How our...
Written by Kelly Damewood on Monday, January 23, 2017 on advocacy, livestock, policy, regulatory

On January 18, 2017, the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) released the Organic Livestock and Poultry Practices rule. CCOF strongly supports the rule because it requires high animal welfare standards, including sufficient outdoor access for poultry. The rule would make the standards that CCOF has always required of its certified operations applicable to all USDA organic producers. CCOF was one of the first organizations to call for more consistency in verifying that organic poultry have sufficient outdoor access. We are pleased that UDSA is bringing clarity for consumers,...
Written by Kelly Damewood on Monday, January 23, 2017 on advocacy, marketing, policy, research

The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) is seeking public comments on the proposed Organic Research, Promotion, and Information Order, also known as a proposed organic check-off program. USDA will accept comments now through March 20, 2017. You may submit comments to www.regulations.gov, under docket number AMS-SC-16-0112. The proposed organic check-off program would be funded by organic producers. It would include a range of agricultural commodities such as fruits, vegetables, dairy, meat, poultry, breads, grains, snack foods, condiments, beverages, and packaged and prepared foods...
Written by Peter Nell on Monday, January 23, 2017 on advocacy, materials and inputs, NOSB, policy

The public comment period is now open for the United States Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) proposed 2017 Sunset Rule to remove 11 substances from the National List of Allowed and Prohibited Substances (National List). If the USDA finalizes the proposed rule, then 11 previously allowed substances would be prohibited from organic production as of June 27, 2017. USDA will accept public comments on the proposed rule through March 20, 2017. Comments may be submitted to www.regulations.gov using docket number AMS-NOP-16-0052. The proposed rule would remove the following three synthetic...
Written by Guest Blogger on Monday, January 23, 2017 on materials and inputs

Join us in learning more about OMRI-listed crop biostimulants/biofertilizers that contain microbes. Get a better return on investment from these products and help others to, also. Register now for three free conference calls teaming university, company, and grower expertise. The total value of the U.S. biofertilizer market is $120 million dollars and increasing rapidly. No surprise, given evidence indicating that nearly 40 percent of a large number of sustainable-organic vegetable growers used one or more Microbe-Containing Biostimulants and Biofertilizers (MCBSFs) nearly every season from...
Written by Zea Sonnabend on Tuesday, January 17, 2017 on advocacy, pests and pesticides, policy


The stakes are high in the fight to save California citrus from the threat of Asian citrus psyllid (ACP) and the disease it spreads, Huanglongbing (HLB) (also known as citrus greening). In Florida, more than 90 percent of commercial citrus trees are estimated to have HLB, and there has been a 70 percent decline in production, with an economic impact of $7.8 billion. California growers and government have invested heavily in trying to contain the spread of the pest and disease. Because of this, and somewhat because of the varied geography of California compared to Florida, the pest has not...

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