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Save the Date! Bagrada Bug Meeting Dec. 11 in Salinas

CCOF is collaborating with the California Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA), scientists from numerous agencies, and Cooperative Extension on a Bagrada Bug Working Group. The working group brings together scientists and extension personnel from across the country who are working to develop organic management and biological control of Bagrada bug.

What is Bagrada bug?

Sign Up Now for Conservation and Bird Habitat Programs

Organic farmers and ranchers can sign up now for technical assistance and funding from two different programs. The Conservation Reserve Program pays farmers and ranchers to take land out of production and restore it with resource-conserving plant species. The Working Lands for Wildlife program offers funds to restore and protect habitat for greater sage grouse and the southwestern willow flycatcher.

Spring 2013 NOSB Meeting Report

Survey for Small-Scale and Urban Livestock and Poultry Producers

The growing numbers of small-scale farms (SSFs)1 and peri-urban and urban animal agriculture farms (UA)2 has increased the need for Extension specialists and veterinarians focused on small-scale and backyard livestock production. We are seeking your help in this needs assessment regarding animal health concerns on SSFs and UA in California, Colorado, Oregon, and Washington state. This study is led by Dr. Alda Pires (University of California), Dr. Dale Moore (Washington State University), and Dr. Ragan Adams (Colorado State University).

The Organic Center Seeks Organic Solutions for Citrus Greening

Citrus greening disease, also known by its Chinese name Huanglongbing, threatens the citrus industry on a massive scale. It has devastated millions of acres of citrus crops throughout the United States and abroad, ravaging citrus in countries in Asia, Africa, and South America. The highly destructive disease can spread quickly, and once a tree is infected it cannot be cured.

The Science Advisory Panel Report for Asian Citrus Psyllid

Organic citrus growers have spent more than a year now wading through the decision-making process for policies regarding the spread and eradication of Asian Citrus Psyllid (ACP) and the deadly disease it can spread, Huanglongbing (HLB) or Citrus Greening. The California Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA) relies on a group of scientists known as the Science Advisory Panel (SAP) for recommendations about trapping and testing protocols, eradication zones, quarantines, and which materials are approved for control and/or eradication.

Update on Asian Citrus Psyllid for Organic Producers

The Asian Citrus Psyllid (ACP) is spreading throughout California. Organic and non-organic citrus growers are concerned about the spread of ACP because it can spread HuanLongBing (HLB), also known as Citrus Greening disease. This report is an update on activities around detection, quarantine, and control of ACP and HLB.

Update: Spread of Asian Citrus Psyllid

Update October 7, 2013:

Update: Your Attendance is Critical at Food Safety Rule Listening Sessions

Update 04/30/13:

The FDA has extended the comment period on the proposed food safety regulations until September 16.  This change was made as a result of numerous requests for more time to review the proposals, which are complex.  The additional time offers CCOF members an opportunity to provide more feedback about the proposals, areas for concerns, or suggested changes. We encourage you to continue sending us your feedback to policy@ccof.org.

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